StreetcredMusic...This blog has followed a quote I heard many years ago..."Sometimes you must leap first, and build your wings on the way down". From nothing it has become a blog containing dozens of Indie artists. Follow me as I introduce you to them, from the place where they breed, New York City! ....and come with us as we document it on film!!

COVER: #Women 2020




Visit the Movie Page::
https://www.facebook.com/pages/StreetcredMusic-the-Documentary-Film/236369733150822










Saturday

StreetcredMusic. Black History Month 2019, Marilyn McCoo

Marilyn McCoo:

She met Billy Davis, Jr. in 1966 when he established the 5th Dimension, then called The Versatiles. The rest is history.

 Video:"One Less Bell To Answer"

Marilyn and Billy Davis Jr
"One Less Bell to Answer" is a song written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David. Originally written in 1967 for Keely Smith, the song was rediscovered in late 1969 by Bones Howe, the producer for the 5th Dimension, and the song was included on the group's 1970 debut album for Bell Records, Portrait. Lead vocals on the single were sung by Marilyn McCoo.
"One Less Bell to Answer" was a platinum record. The song reached number two on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, behind My Sweet Lord by George Harrison. On other US charts, it went to number one on the Adult Contemporary chart, as well as No. 4 on the Best Selling Soul Singles chart.

Other Black History Month stories..HERE!

Follow me: Pete Carma

StreetcredMusic. Black History Month, Thelonious Monk

Thelonious Monk
So many times watching him with his amazing musicians in the small clubs in Manhattan, I never realized that he was one of the greatest pianist of jazz, cuz there were so many in his era.

Enjoy this video:"Don't Blame Me"




"Don't Blame Me" is a popular song with music by Jimmy McHugh and lyrics by Dorothy Fields. The song was part of the 1932 show Clowns in Clover and was published in 1933. Popular versions that year were recorded by Ethel Waters, Guy Lombardo, and Charles Agnew.
It was a No. 21 hit for Nat King Cole in 1948. The song received two significant "rock era" remakes: a ballad version by the Everly Brothers in 1961 which reached No. 20 on Billboard and an up-tempo version by Frank Ifield which reached No. 8 of the UK charts on 15 February 1964.

Other Black History Month articles: HERE

Follow me:Pete Carma